PAWS NEED CLAWS CAMPAIGN
Kind, easy, & effective solutions for peacefully living with cat claws & natural scratching. 
Cat claws should never have to lead to property damage, declawing, or relinquishment!
 

celebrate claws - cats do!

RESOURCES for tenants when landlords require cat declawing.

If you or any of your clients or adopters are dealing with a landlord that
requires cat declawing, please pass along the resources listed below that
can inspire and empower them to challenge this requirement.

In many cases landlords have no idea that the surgery actually entails painful
amputation. Nor are they familiar with all the products on the market today to
help humanely manage cat claws and natural scratching. The vast majority of
cats can easily be redirected to do their healthy scratching on cardboard
scratch pads and sisal posts, & Soft Paws (
http://www.softpaws.com) and
Sticky Tape (
http://www.stickypaws.com) are excellent products for the
stubborn, but still trainable, cats.

These resources also include some of the evidence that declawed paws can
result in, or develop into, behavioral problems like litterbox avoidance, which
can lead to urine smelling and soaked carpets, floors, and baseboards - a
much more extensive and expensive property damage for the landlords to
repair.

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*MUST READ* Declawing Cats Required To Rent?, Jean Hofve, DVM
http://www.littlebigcat.com/declawing/declawing-cats-required-to-rent/ 

Tenants Rights - Landlords versus your cat
http://www.renttopets.ca/tenants-rights-and-pets-the-landlord-vs-your-cat/#comment-3

The MAPCA’s Pets in Housing Program
"Declawing of cats can not be required by management. As the pet owner is fully liable for all destruction of property, management should not anticipate the
possibility of damage and request this very painful procedure."
http://www.mspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=advo_Pets_in_Housing_Program

Best Friends for Life - Humane Housing for Animals & People
Published in 2001 by the Doris Day League and Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty To Animals. page 50, "Declawing of cats can not be required by management..."
http://www.ddal.org/pdf/bffl.pdf

Massachusetts Animal Coalition Tips For Landlords
DO and DON'Ts for Landlords

DON’T: Require declawing of cats. This is a cruel and disfiguring procedure which often results in more severe behavior problems. Scratching is better solved with behavior modification and management techniques on the part of the cat owner.”
http://www.massanimalcoalition.org/landlords.html#_DO’S_AND_DON’Ts

"Landlords should not require you to declaw your cat. As a renter, you are already fully liable for all destruction of property. Often, landlords don’t understand that declawing is very cruel and can lead to chronic pain, neurosis, and even skin and bladder problems. Educate your landlord about declawing, pointing out that many declawed cats develop aversions to the litterbox and begin urinating and defecating outside of it.” http://www.helpinganimals.com/animalsHome_gi_renting.asp

"…Bryan Pease, an attorney with the Animal Protection and Rescue League in San Diego,,,. “There's no way that federal law or any other law would require cats to be declawed because it's such a cruel procedure. It's been outlawed in several jurisdictions.”
http://www.hidesertstar.com/articles/2006/09/16/news/news2.txt

Will Declawing my Cat Reduce Damage to Household Items?
By Wisconsin Humane Society
http://www.wihumane.org/education/WisconsinHumaneSociety-Declawing.aspx

Congress Takes A Swipe At Declawing, HSUS 2007
http://hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2007/07/declawing.html

*Published 2/1/03 on CourierPostOnline.com, "Eighty percent of the cats that are surrendered that are declawed are euthanized because they have a behavioral problem…. Declawed cats frequently become biters and also stop using litter boxes… One or the other…,” said William Lombardi shelter director, Gloucester County, New Jersey.

*“Gloucester County Animal Shelter, says Lombardi, who’s been the director for three years and an animal control officer for 25.
Cats with claws, he says, are always surrendered for human-related issues, mainly “moving and can’t take the cat with us.” Declawed cats, on the other hand, have behavior problems, and most who come in end up having to be euthanized. Even when Lombardi works with declawed cats and tries to place them in new homes, they often come back to the shelter for not using the litter box”.…”Almost all of our hotline calls are declawed cats with litter box issues,” says Pat Rock of the Oshkosh Area Humane Society in Wisconsin.” "The Declaw Dilemma", Nancy Lawson http://www.animalsheltering.org/resource_library/magazine_articles/may_jun_2004/declaw_dilemma.pdf

*In a study published in the January, 2001 JAVMA, 33% of 39 cats that underwent onychectomy developed "at least" one behavior problem immediately after surgery, with the most common problems being litter box problems and biting.

*Seventy percent (70%) of cats turned in to pounds and shelters for behavioral problems are declawed. (National Survey from pounds & shelters obtained by Caddo Parrish Forgotten Felines & Friends)
http://www.sniksnak.com/cathealth/declaw.html

*From the Summer 2002 issue of PETA’s Animal Times: “A survey by a Delaware animal  shelter showed that more than 75% of the cats turned in for avoiding their litter boxes had been declawed.”

*”In my own three-year experience, 95% of calls about declawed cats related to litter box problems, while only 46% of clawed cats had such problems—and most of those were older cats with physical ailments. Of my calls, only declawed cats have cost their owners security deposits, leather sofas and floorboards. And it’s mostly declawed cats that have been prescribed pain killers, anti-depressants, tranquilizers and steroids. Two-thirds of my calls are about litter box problems. In 90% of those cases, the cat is declawed, sick or old. In 7 years, only 3 people have called about a “scratching-the-sofa problem” - yet countless of “healthy” declawed cats have peed on sofas." Annie Bruce, cat consultant & author of CAT BE GOOD,
http://www.goodcatswearblack.com

* “Anecdotal evidence of behavior changes occurring post-
onychectomy provides compelling support for the observation that declawing cats increases their likelihood of expressing litter box avoidance and aggressive biting. The studies done so far to analyze this relationship have been limited in their ability to control multiple variables and form a definitive conclusion. However, the observations of many veterinary practitioners and behaviorists give strong support for these connections.” AVAR's Cat Declawing Position Statement
http://www.avar.org

* “Dr. Susan Swanson, DVM, owner of the Cat Care Clinic in Mahtomedi, Minnesota, notes that "year after year, the declawed cats that I see in my practice have higher rates of litter box issues such as inappropriate elimination"…Nearly every shelter and rescue group director in the country makes the same observation. Sore paws that don't feel like digging in the litter may be one reason why declawed cats are more prone to litter box rejection. (The accumulated stress buildup from lack of scratching may also be a contributing factor, as stress is implicated in half of all urinary tract problems).” "Why Cats Need Claws", Gary Loewenthal http://www.oahs.org/pdf/WhyCatsNeedTheirClaws.pdf#search=%22%22%3AWhy%20Cats%20Need%20Claws%22%22

* “Asthma and cystitis (inflammation of the bladder) have also been linked to the stress of declaws…consider the possibility of post-surgery behavior problems – especially litterbox issues and aggression…reports abound among cat owners and some animal behaviorists also notice a link. Karen Overall, VMD, Ph.D a specialist in veterinary medicine, has seen transient aggression and reluctance to use the litterbox after declaw. There is also the issue of trust...Interestingly, the humane society workers have made these claims about declawed cats for years”. "Declaw Details", Dr. Brenda McClelland, DVM, Cat Fancy Magazine Jan 2006 p. 44-47

* “…San Francisco Care and Control ("some declawed cats become more nervous biters; others are known to become even more destructive to furniture than before the operation; and many cats stop using the litterbox"), East Bay SPCA ("deprived of their primary form of defense, declawed cats become nervous, fearful, and/or aggressive, often using their only remaining defense, their teeth. Some cats stop using their litter pan. This may be associated to the discomfort of scratching in the litter after the surgery"), and Palo Alto Humane Society ("we have a no-declaw policy"). These organizations and the individuals working there are obviously highly motivated to find each cat a home and do not wish to see the cat returned. They have found that declawed cats, with a disproportionate rate of biting and house soiling, have a relatively low adoption success rate.” Dr. Jennifer Conrad, DVM, The Paw Project,
http://www.pawproject.com/html/faqs.asp

* “In some cases, when declawed cats use the litterbox after surgery, their feet are so tender they associate their new pain with the box...permanently, resulting in a life-long adversion to using the litter box. Other declawed cats that can no longer mark with their claws, they mark with urine instead resulting in inappropriate elimination problems, which in many cases, results in relinquishment of the cats to shelters and ultimately euthanasia. Many of the cats surrendered to shelters are surrendered because of behavioral problems which developed after the cats were declawed. Risk factors for relinquishment of cats to an animal shelter: "Among 218 cats relinquished to a shelter, more (52.4%) declawed cats than non-declawed cats (29.1%) were reported by owners to have inappropriate elimination problems." Source: World Small Animal Veterinary Association – 2001 http://maxshouse.com/facts_about_declawing.htm

“…our cat care coordinator, was becoming increasingly disturbed at the euthanasia rate for declawed cats and decided to conduct an informal study. She discovered that more than 80% of declawed cats that were either returned or owner surrendered that year were done so because of litterbox problems or biting.” http://declaw.lisaviolet.com/declawshelter.html

“Behavioral problems frequently haunt declawed cats. By far, the commonest thing we see is cats not using the litterbox. When cats have stress beyond what they can take, it often shows up as a litterbox problem and declawing makes them stress intolerant, in general, for the rest of their lives,” Dr. Harrison, DVM. Dr. Harrison gets 3-12 calls a day about litter box problems in cats and, after ruling out medical problems, 90 percent of the cats with litter box aversion are declawed cats. “Declawing: Behavior Modification or Destructive Surgery”, Animal Issues, 1998

“Chronic physical ailments such as cystitis or skin disorders can be manifestations of a declawed cat’s frustration and stress.”
David E. Hartnett, DVM
http://www.petstation.com/declaw.html

*In a recent study published October, 2001, JAVMA by Dr. Gary J. Patronek, VMD, PhD., “…declawed cats were at an increased risk of relinquishment.”

For more information on declawing and humane claw management, please read:

http://www.declawing.com

http://www.de-clawing.com

http://www.catscratching.com

http://www.purrfectpost.com

http://www.softpaws.com

http://www.stickypaws.com

http://www.pawproject.org

   ATTENTION LANDLORDS!
     Prevent Urine Property Damage!

Allowing pets as renters is a great money maker for landlords!
Attracting long term, quality renters with a demonstrated ability to care for valuables, & charging a higher security deposit, or extra pet fees, are easy ways to help the units stay occupied & the business to prosper!  

 

When landlords do allow cats as tenants though, many require that they be “declawed” thinking this will prevent damage to their property. What they may not know is that declawing is a serious, painful surgery whose effects can actually cause damage to the property.

"DECLAWING involves 10 separate, painful amputations of a cat’s knucklebone, tendons, ligaments, & nerves. It is actually “de-toeing” or “de-knuckling” a cat which is illegal in many countries because it permanently disfigures a healthy paw. This is a medically unnecessary surgery that carries risks & physical, psychological, & behavioral consequences.

Studies prove that declawed cats use their teeth more (they become "mouthy" since their main means of claw defense is now gone) and their litterbox less due to a variety of reasons including chronic or intermittent paw pain, pain association with the litterbox, and arthritis. It may feel much better to a declawed cat to urinate on a smooth surface than to dig their declawed paws into rough litter. The floors, carpet, drywall, baseboards, and woodwork may be the new place where the cat urinates, creating lingering urine smell, penetrating urine soaking, and extensive and expensive property damage.

 

 

   "In my own three-year experience, 95% of calls about declawed cats related to litter box problems, while only 46% of clawed cats had such problemsand most of those were older cats with physical ailments. Of my calls, only declawed cats have cost their owners security deposits, leather sofas and floorboards. ...Two-thirds of my calls are about litter box problems. In 90% of those cases, the cat is declawed, sick or old. In 7 years, only 3 people have called about a “scratching-the-sofa problem” - yet countless of “healthy” declawed cats have peed on sofas."  Annie Bruce, cat consultant & author of CAT BE GOOD, http://www.goodcatswearblack.com

 

Instead of requiring cat declawing, landlords can ask renters for a resume or bio of their cats depicting how they address cat scratching. Require that each cat tenant have tall sisal scratching posts and several cardboard scratch pads before moving in. The vast majority of cats can easily be redirected to do their healthy scratching on cardboard scratch pads and sisal posts, and there is also Soft Paws (http://www.softpaws.com) & Sticky Paws (http://www.stickypaws.com)))) for more stubborn, but still trainable, cats.

Massachusetts Animal Coalition Tips For Landlords DO and DON'Ts for Landlords

DON’T: Require declawing of cats.

This is a cruel and disfiguring procedure which often results in more severe behavior problems. Scratching is better solved with behavior modification and management techniques on the part of the cat owner.” http://www.massanimalcoalition.org/landlords.html#_DO’S_AND_DON’Ts


HUMANE ALTERNATIVES:

NAIL TRIMMING: regular nail trims keep claws blunt & harmless and unable to snag or tear furniture, carpet or woodwork.

 

SCRATCH POSTS: sturdy, tall, coarse sisal scratch posts really work! http://www.purrfectpost.com

 

CARDBOARD SCRATCH PADS: corrugated cardboard naturally attracts cats for scratching and can be purchased at most grocery stores these days. 

 

STICKYPAWS: or double-sided tape can be put over woodwork to prevent damage. http://www.stickypaws.com

 

SOFT PAWS: vinyl nail caps that are glued over cat claws. http://www.softpaws.com


(*If you would like this information in a Word Document, check HERE!)

 

             FROM A LANDLORD...

I
have been a landlord for over 30 years and have rented to many people with cats during this time. I have never had to withhold any security deposits from cat damage, nor do I ask for an additional deposit when cats are part of the family that is renting from us….

 

I think that other landlords might be gratified to learn of an extremely high correlation (that I have found) for when a prospective tenant says that they would never do something like that to a cat (declaw)...will turn out to be a great tenant who will not want to disturb other tenants and care about taking care of the landlord's property…

 

I do encourage companion people to put a lot of scratching posts all over when the apartment has wall to wall carpeting, and have never had a problem with cats ruining any carpets.”

 

T. Line Development